Thursday, July 14, 2005

Knock Three Times

There has been a rash of reportings of data theft lately that has a very strange effect of causing many to become complacent about their data protection measures because, after all, their system is working.
The problem is that there is no way to know if your data is bulletproof. You can only be certain when it is not, and you have evidence that your security has been breached. The vast majority of data theft, including PHI, is undetectable, and unprosecutable, because unlike physical theft, the stolen data is still there. If someone sneaks into a museum in the dead of night, dressed in spandex and night googles, and makes off with a Bottecelli, in the morning there is a big square of unfaded wall, an empty nail, a light dusting of tracked-through laser-detection talcum powder, and no painting. The problem with stolen data is that most of the time there is no way to know that your system has been breached, or if it has been, that anything is missing because nothing is actually missing.
So what do you do to keep your data secure?
The threats come in three flavors, and there are steps that you can take to protect yourself from each one.
1. The Barbarians at the Gates. There are people out there who don't like you. There are people out there who don't care about you, but want what you have. And there are people out there who don't care about you, or what you have, but want inside just. because. they. can.
These are the folks that firewalls were invented to thwart, and I assume that y'all have covered this loophole. Firewalls, encryption, strong passwords, and some sort of Intrusion Detection System (IDS) cover you there. If you don't understand or like this stuff (hard for me to believe, but then again I went heavily into BetaMax, so what do I know) hire someone who does. A competent IT security consultant can set up most small practices in a few hours of system hardening. Do make sure that the contract includes some basic training for your users concerning the changes and best practices.
2. The Enemy Within. Far more likely to cause you grief is the viper cherished in your bosom. No one knows for sure, but I would guess that the retail model applies here--- 90% internal theft. After all, who else holds the keys to your kingdom? Training, monitoring, set usage policies, and careful terminal check-out procedures can help, but you never know. If you have 20 employees and they all seem perfectly content, either you are the shining example all other bosses should aspire to, or at least 5% of your workforce is adept at hiding their dissatisfaction. I know which one seems most likely to me.
3. Stupid is as Stupid Does. And Stupid seems to be doing more than his fair share lately. Data theft is the classic crime of opportunity. "It was just laying there, so I took it." Or "The web site was unsecured" (here) or "The safe was left open" (here) or -one that I recently was asked about- "I left the box of records in the back seat, and someone borrowed my car." I love consulting, but dang, please make it harder for me, will ya? No more post-it notes with passwords conveniently stuck to the monitor, or so cleverly stuck under the keyboard. No more backup tapes on a shelf behind your desk, or stacked on top of the server. No more shared passwords for the entire office.
Once again, if you don't know about this stuff, contract someone who does. It is so very much cheaper and less stressful to spend a few bucks and a few hours hardening your system and providing a few hours of common sense training for your crew than it is to learn about your PHI disclosure from the guy with good hair and too many teeth holding the mike and standing sideways in your lobby so his cameraman can get a good shot.

2 comments:

Carl Spackler said...

hippa schmipa. hiliary clinton is the anti-christ.

michael said...

carl--
See my next post!